Mar 05, 2021  
2013-14 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2013-14 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

11. Courses


 
  
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    ED 300 - Education as a Profession

    Credits: 3

    This course seeks to involve prospective teachers in the issues of schooling and education and to give them a clear view of the skills and knowledge they will need to be successful professionals. The philosophical foundations and history of American education, governance, finance, and ethical and legal issues are discussed. Formal application for “Admission to Teacher Education” will be made during the course.

  
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    ED 302 - Art and Science of Teaching

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 300

    This course focuses on preparing students to use the INTASC (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) Core Standards as the basis for planning meaningful instruction, managing the classroom environment, and meeting needs of diverse learners. Candidates will practice selecting appropriate teaching methods, developing lesson plans, and using technology in the classroom.

    Note: 20 hour field experience required; no exemptions will be granted.

  
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    ED 304 - Principles of Early Childhood Learning

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: Corequisite ED 300

    A survey of contemporary approaches, practices, and issues in early childhood education including the background history, philosophy and theory of their origins. The basics of physical, social and cognitive development will be addressed along with the increasingly diverse student population found in today’s schools. Emphasis will also be placed on the interrelationship of home and community in the development of the young child.

  
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    ED 305 - Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 111, 112 (grade of C or above), ED 302, and admission to Teacher Education

    A survey of techniques needed in teaching arithmetical concepts and the four fundamental processes of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals, as well as elementary percentage, geometry, and measurement. Experiences are provided to insure competence in teaching estimation and problem solving. Stress is given to the use of these in meaningful situations for children. Special attention is placed on the Teacher as Decision Maker in applying the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics as developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

    Note: ED 305, 310, 312 and 334 must be taken concurrently.

  
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    ED 306 - Introduction to Exceptional Learners

    Credits: 3

    This course includes concepts, perspectives, and guiding principles that are basic to an understanding of human exceptionality. Individual areas of exceptionality will be explored as well as issues relative to ethnic diversity.

  
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    ED 310 - Teaching Social Studies in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302, must have completed all core Social Studies courses

    This course focuses on the preparation of pre-service teachers to translate knowledge and data gathering processes from history and the social sciences into appropriate and meaningful social studies experiences for students.

    Note: ED 305, 310, 312 and 334 must be taken concurrently.

  
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    ED 312 - Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302, must have completed all core Science courses

    This course focuses on the preparation of pre-service teachers to focus on academic, personal, social, and career applications of the biological, earth, space, and physical sciencesas well as concepts in science and technology, the history and nature of science, and the inquiry process scientists use, in order to develop skills in instruction that promotes understanding and positive attitudes among students.

    Note: ED 305, 310, 312 and 334 must be taken concurrently.

  
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    ED 334 - Methods for Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302, EN 101, 300

    This course is designed to provide the methods and materials for making appropriate professional decisions in teaching reading and the language arts in grades K-8. Emphasis is placed on a literature-based approach to instruction in oral and written language, spelling, handwriting and grammar.

    Note: ED 305, 310, 312 and 334 must be taken concurrently.

  
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    ED 351 - Educational Measurement

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of this course is to examine assessment techniques, test construction, test statistics, interpretation, application, and their relationship to instructional decisions. Major attention is given to the construction of classroom assessment instruments and determination of their reliability and validity. Ethical issues of assessment, assessment needs of diverse populations, and standardized testing instruments are also examined.

  
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    ED 361 - Early Literacy Instruction I

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300 Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 302

    The act of teaching is a reflective decision making process involving interactions with students, colleagues, parents and members of the community. This course is designed to introduce students to theory and best practices in literacy, concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development, and systematic early reading and writing instruction specific to concepts about print, phonemic awareness and phonics.

    Note: Requires 10 hours field experience.

  
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    ED 362 - Early Literacy Instruction II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in ED 302. Required of all elementary majors

    The major emphasis of this course will be concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development and early systematic reading and writing instruction specific to vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

  
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    ED 365 - Content Area Reading

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300

    The purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to strategies for teaching reading in the content areas. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of comprehension strategies across the curriculum.  10 hours Field Experiences

  
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    ED 366 - Reading Assessment and Intervention

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300, 361, or ED 362, or 365

    The purpose of this course is to provide teacher candidates with a strong knowledge base of various assessment methods and intervention strategies for teaching reading. Students will be expected to demonstrate the application of assessment methods and intervention strategies.  10 hours Field Experiences

  
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    ED 401 - Teacher Internship Seminar: Classroom Management

    Credits: 3

    The course is designed to provide training and in-depth study of management concepts and practices in elementary and secondary classrooms. Causes of student misconduct and remedial activities will be reviewed. Laboratory experiences will be designed to develop skills in management of/and interaction with students with diverse needs. Special attention will be given to delivery of instruction in specific teaching areas.

    Note: This course is restricted to current semester teacher interns or to students approved by the Teacher Education Committee.

  
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    ED 406 - Observation and Directed Teaching Grades K-8

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a teacher internship center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Teacher Interns will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Teacher interns will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Student Teaching.

  
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    ED 407 - Observation and Directed Teaching Grades K-12

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a teacher internship center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Teacher Interns will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Teacher Interns will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Teacher Internship.

  
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    ED 409 - Observation and Directed Teaching in Secondary Education Grades 7-12

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a teacher internship center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed.  Teacher Interns will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Teacher Interns will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Teacher Internship.

  
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    ED 498 - Instructional Technology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 497 or a computer course

    This course will focus on fundamental concepts and skills for applying instructional technologies to educational settings and for making decisions regarding the most appropriate use. The instructional technologies include authoring/development software, multimedia computers, electronic presentation/projection systems, Internet access, and TV/VCR applications. This course is elective for education majors and recommended for graduate students.

  
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    ED 499 - Special Topics In Education

    Credits: 1-6

    Students must be admitted to Graduate Studies to enroll in courses numbered 500 or above.

    Note: (Undergraduate) This course will be used to address major topics and issues of interest and need in the field of education. Extended studies will be conducted in professional development areas affecting the role of school in society.

  
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    EDS 313 - Introduction to Special Education

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 306

    Introduction to the legal, philosophical and educational bases of the education of the handicapped. Particular emphasis is given to state and federal law, referral to placement, use of cumulative records and Individual Education Plan development.

  
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    EDS 320 - Education of the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 306

    This course includes instructional management planning, individual education program development, materials, resources, and strategies for teaching students with mild/moderate handicaps.

  
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    EDS 324 - Teaching in the Inclusion Classroom

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EDS 313 and admission to Teacher Internship or existing teacher certification

    This course is designed for students who have chosen special education as an add-on to an elementary or secondary education certification or for those holding teacher certification who wish to acquire skills necessary to teach special needs students in a general education classroom. The course material and learning activities prepare students to plan, deliver and assess instruction in an inclusion setting.

  
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    EDS 330 - Procedures for the Resource Room

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Internship

    This course focuses on the organization and procedures for the effective use of instruction, space, scheduling, materials, and personnel in both the elementary and secondary resource classroom. Administrative and teacher responsibilities will be included as well as techniques for collaboration and consultation with other professionals and parents.

  
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    EDS 414 - Practicum in the Elementary Resource Room

    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite: Possession of an elementary teaching certificate or EDS 320 and 330

    Practicum experience in the education of elementary age mildly/moderately handicapped students. This course is designed to allow individuals who hold an elementary teaching certificate to add an Education of the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped endorsement to their existing certificate.

  
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    EDS 415 - Practicum in the Secondary Resource Room

    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite: Possession of a secondary or special subject area teaching certificate or EDS 320, 330

    Practicum experience in the education of secondary age mild/moderately handicapped students. This course is designed to allow individuals who hold a secondary teaching certificate to add an Education of the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped endorsement to their existing certificate.

  
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    EN 100 - Basic Writing

    Credits: 3

    A study of essentials of grammar and composition with emphasis upon paragraph development. Instruction and exercises in writing and revision of writing. Required of freshmen whose proficiency in composition and reading is determined by testing to be below collegiate standards maintained in English 101. Prerequisite for entrance in English 101 for students identified for the course.

    Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

  
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    EN 101 - English Composition I

    Credits: 3

    EN 101 is a study of the principles of composition and effective paragraph and sentence structure. Students will write, revise, and edit essays.  In order to support their ideas, students will learn to use evidence which may include readings, observations, interviews, and memories.  This course contains a documentation assignment.

    Note: Required of all students. Does not count toward the English major. Final grade is A, B, C, NC (No Credit). A student must earn a grade of at least a C in the course before enrolling in any other English course. A grade of No Credit will not affect a student’s quality point average.

  
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    EN 102 - English Composition II

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite: EN 101

    EN 102 is a study of analytical and interpretive skills necessary for constructing a well-supported argument.  Students will learn to integrate sources into their writing.  Students will develop information literacy and research skills, including writing a research paper with multiple sources.  Required of all students.  Does not count toward the English major.  Final grade is A, B, C, NC (No Credit).  A student must earn a grade of at least a C in the course before enrolling in any other English course.  A grade of No Credit will not affect a student’s quality point average.

     


  
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    EN 201 - Survey of Early English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study in chronological order of selected works representative of different periods of English literature from Beowulf through the mid eighteenth century. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 202 - Survey of Late English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study in chronological order of selected works representative of different periods of English literature from the eighteenth century to modern times. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 203 - Survey of Early American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study of the development of American literature with emphasis on major writings and their relation to the main currents of American thought from the Spanish colonization to the mid nineteen century. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 204 - Survey of Late American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study of the development of American literature with emphasis upon major writings and their relation to the main currents of American thought from the mid nineteenth century through the present. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 231 - Survey of Early World Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A survey of major texts in the literatures of Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Middle East, focusing on myth, drama, epic, and lyric from the ancient world to the early modern era. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 232 - Survey of Late World Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study of major texts in the literatures of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas, focusing on important works of prose, drama, and poetry from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 299 - Special Topics in English

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    This course will be used for lower-level seminars. The course content will vary each time the course is offered.

  
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    EN 300 - Advanced Composition

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A continuation of the study and computer-assisted practice of expository writing in standard English. The course focuses on analytical and practical writing skills. Some papers are based on documented research and reading in the student’s major field; others will simulate writing required in professional or work-place situations. Parallel readings, peer editing conferences, and conferences with the instructor are also included.

  
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    EN 302 - History and Structure of the English Language

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course begins with basic linguistic concepts and a brief study of phonology, and then moves through discussions of the major language families descended from Indo-European, English as a Germanic Language, Old English, Middle English, and Modern English. A special focus is placed upon the political and social aspects of language, as well as morphology, vocabulary, and grammar.

  
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    EN 303 - Early Shakespeare

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A critical reading of a number of Shakespeare’s plays written up to 1603. Collateral reading of critical essays.

  
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    EN 304 - Late Shakespeare

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A critical reading of a number of Shakespeare’s plays written after 1603. Collateral reading of critical essays.

  
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    EN 305 - Advanced Grammar

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course will explore the complexities of English syntax primarily from the perspective of structuralist linguistics. This course will also introduce students to other approaches to English syntax, such as traditional and transformational-generative grammar, and to English morphology.

  
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    EN 311 - Nonfiction Writing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study of various types of advanced exposition, formal and informal essays, and the principles of the short narrative, with collateral readings and practice in original writing of the various forms studied.

  
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    EN 312 - Creative Writing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    A study of the craft of creative writing. The course will focus on the development of a portfolio of poetry and short fiction through workshop discussions and individual conferences, along with collateral readings on the creative process, literary terms, and forms.

  
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    EN 317 - Technical and Business Writing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102

    Combined lecture-workshop approach to special forms, styles, and problems encountered in writing for industry, business, and technology. Includes writing of mechanism description, process analysis, instructions, formal and informal reports, research reports, proposals; also includes audience analysis, technical editing, and use of graphics.

  
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    EN 334 - Ancient Greek and Roman Myth

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of ancient Greek and Roman myth in translation. Authors include Homer, Pindar, Ovid, Virgil, Hesiod, and others.

  
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    EN 341 - Teaching English as a Second Language

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    Introduction to major theories, methodology, and strategies of teaching English as a second language including an introduction to the historical background of methods used for teaching languages to non-native speakers and to various strategies that have been proposed in the field to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. This task-based class will also focus on syllabi and lesson plan preparations.

  
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    EN 342 - Second Language Acquisition

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A survey of the major theories of language acquisition, including theories of first language acquisition, theories of second-language acquisition, theories of language learning, styles and strategies of language learning, effect of personality and sociocultural factors on second language learning, and communicative competence with an emphasis on methods of acquiring a second language.

  
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    EN 350 - Women in Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course introduces students to both traditional stereotypes of women in literature and new ways to analyze literature by and about women. Using introductory feminist critical texts, students will learn to focus on what literature says and implies about women: their nature, their roles, their place in society. Readings may include works by Austen, George Eliot, the Brontes, Flaubert, Woolf, Stein, Welty, Atwood, Walker, Rich, and others.

    Also Listed as: WS 350
    Note: Courses with a WS prefix cannot be used toward an area of concentration or a secondary certification area. Students wanting to use this course toward their certification area must enroll in the EN section of this course.

  
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    EN 355 - The Bible as Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of The Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A critical study of the literary themes and genres of the Hebrew Bible, the Christian New Testament, and Apocryphal writings in English translation.  Focuses on themes such as exile/return and covenant and on genres such as origin stories, psalms, prophecy, wisdom literature, parables, epistles, and apocalyptic narrative.

    Also Listed as: REL 355
  
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    EN 360 - African-American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of the major movements in the evolution of African-American literature from the eighteenth century to the present. It includes literary genres such as autobiography, fiction, poetry, and drama. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker.

  
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    EN 370 - Ethnic American Literatures

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy.

    A study of autobiography, fiction, poetry, and drama by American ethnic writers, such as Native, Latino/a, African, Asian, Jewish, and Arab Americans.  Emphasis will be on themes, literary styles, and the historical experience of the writers as well as their contributions to the national literature.

  
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    EN 375 - Women in Medieval Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of the literature of the medieval period both by and about women, with special attention to the impact of the anti-feminist tradition. Some authors/works may include Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, Christine de Pisan, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Margery Kempe, and Marie de France.

    Also Listed as: WS 375
    Note: Courses with a WS prefix cannot be used toward an area of concentration or a secondary certification area. Students wanting to use this course toward their certification area must enroll in the EN section of this course.

  
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    EN 380 - Native American Literatures and Religions

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy.

    A study of Native North American worldviews in traditional oral texts, including myths, songs, and oratory, a well as the genres of personal narrative, fiction, and poetry. Readings may include oral texts in transcription/translation and works in English by Charles Eastman, Zitkala Sa, D’Arcy McNickle, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Linda Hogan, among others.

    Also Listed as: REL 380
  
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    EN 401 - Internship

    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    Qualified students may earn credit for participating in a program approved in advance by the faculty advisor and department chair. The nature of the internship and the number of hours to be worked will determine the number of credit hours. A minimum of 120 hours is required for 3 hours credit. Three hours may be applied toward the major. Remaining hours will count as elective credit toward graduation.

  
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    EN 409 - Literature for Adolescents and Older Children

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102 and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of adolescent and children’s fiction from the nineteenth century to the present. This course will investigate various issues in children’s literature theory. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 410 - Methods & Materials in Secondary English

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education

    A survey of major theories of composition and literature pedagogy, with practical applications to classroom situations. The course requires close reading of selected literary texts to prepare the texts for teaching; it also examines the process of writing pre-writing, writing, revision - with attention to making and evaluating writing assignments. Required for teacher certification.

    Note: This course does not count toward the English major or minor.

    Fall
  
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    EN 411 - Fiction Writing Workshop

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 312 or 3 hours of transfer credit in creative writing

    An advanced study of fiction writing, the course will focus on the development of a portfolio of short fiction and involve workshop discussion of student works, along with collateral readings on the craft of fiction and contemporary short stories.

  
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    EN 412 - Poetry Writing Workshop

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 312 or 3 hours of transfer credit in creative writing

    An advanced study of poetry writing, the course will focus on the development of a portfolio of poems and involve workshop discussion of student works, along with collateral readings of poetics and recent poetry.

  
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    EN 415 - Advanced Writing Workshop

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 411 or EN 412 and permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    The advanced workshop provides students with the opportunity to continue their study of fiction or poetry writing beyond the workshop level. It may be taken in conjunction with a workshop in fiction or poetry, or it may be taken as an independent study.

    Note: May be repeated once for credit if genre content or instructor changes.

  
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    EN 419 - Senior Portfolio

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: EN 411 or EN 412

    The Senior Portfolio is the crowning achievement for students in the Creative Writing Concentration.  Student will review and revise creative work completed during their college careers, collect it in a bound portfolio, and write an introduction in consultation with a creative writing professor.  Students will also explore graduate school and professional opportunities in writing fields. 

    Note: Course is only offered pass/fail.

  
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    EN 420 - Seminar in English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of a period, theme, genre, or other topic of English Literature.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 425 - Seminar in American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of a period, theme, genre or other topic of American Literature.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 426 - Seminar in World Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of a period, theme, genre or other topic of World Literature.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 428 - Independent Study in English

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    An in-depth study of a topic that is not covered in the course catalog.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 433 - Literature in the Postcolonial World

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of major literary works from emerging postcolonial societies in Africa, the Caribbean, South and Central America, and Asia after 1945. Authors studied may include Ngugi Wa Thiong’o, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Jean Rhys, Derek Walcott, V.S. Naipul, Mahasweta Devi, and Salman Rushdie.

  
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    EN 444 - The Earliest English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of the first examples of English Literature, and their sources and analogues. This course explores the heroic world of Beowulf, as well as the earliest Christian poetry, elegies, riddles, and charms.

  
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    EN 445 - Chaucer and the Medieval World

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    An examination of Chaucer’s poetry and the medieval world it reflects, including contemporary European influences on Chaucer’s work. Readings will include The Canterbury Tales, as well as selections from works such as Dante’s Inferno, The Decameron, the Romance of the Rose, and The Consolation of Philsophy.

  
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    EN 453 - Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of the development of English dramatic literature, with the exception of Shakespeare, from the early church beginnings to the closing of the theatres in 1642. Emphasis on Elizabethan drama exclusive of Shakespeare.

  
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    EN 455 - Early Modern Poetry

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    This course will focus on the English poets and poetic movements of the late sixteenth century through the seventeenth century, including both epic and lyric genres. The course will include poets such as John Donne, Phillip Sydney, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Isabella Whitney, Ben Jonson, Andrew Marvell, Aphra Behn, and John Milton.

  
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    EN 473 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    An intensive study of British literature from the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 to 1800 in cultural context. Includes an emphasis on the novel. Authors may include, but are not limited to, Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Charlotte Lennox, Samuel Richardson, Frances Burney, and Samuel Johnson.

  
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    EN 474 - Early British Gothic Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    An intensive study of British Gothic literature from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in cultural context. Includes an emphasis on fiction and on the problems of gender and genre that the Gothic raises. Authors may include, but are not limited to, Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Charlotte Dacre, Mary Shelley, and Walter Scott.

  
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    EN 475 - The English Novel

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of the development of the novel in Britain through the nineteenth century. The novels selected for study will represent a variety of fictional types and techniques. Collateral readings; critical essays.

  
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    EN 478 - English Literature of the Early Nineteenth Century

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of selected works of poetry, fiction, and essays of the early nineteenth century. Writers studied may include Burns, Blake, Dorothy and William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Lamb, Hazlitt, Byron, the Shelleys, Keats, DeQuincey. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 479 - English Literature of the Later Nineteenth Century

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of representative works of poetry, fiction, and essays of the Victorian era. Attention will also be given to the social and political issues of the time. Collateral reading, critical essays.

  
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    EN 480 - Literary Theory

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    An intensive study of some of the major schools of contemporary literary theory, the philosophical traditions from which they derive, and the critical issues that they raise. Practical applications to literary analysis.

  
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    EN 484 - American Literature of the Early Nineteenth Century

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of American literature from the early nineteenth century to the 1860’s. Readings in fiction, nonfiction, poetry and autobiography; may include Melville, Poe, Douglass, Jacobs, Alcott, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, and others. Collateral reading and research; critical essays.

  
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    EN 485 - American Literature of the Later Nineteenth Century

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of the literature associated with the realistic and naturalistic periods in American literature. Authors may include, but are not limited to, Rebecca Harding Davis, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Henry James, Sarah Orne Jewett, W. D. Howells, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Frank Norris, Sinclair Lewis; collateral readings.

  
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    EN 490 - The Literature of the South

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of Southern writers from the early 20th century to the present. Readings include short story writers and novelists. Readings will also include both well-known writers such as William Faulkner and Carson McCullers, and New South writers such as Frederick Barthelme and Barry Hannah.

  
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    EN 491 - Modern Poetry

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of Modern Poetry from 1900 to 1950. The course will focus on modernist movements, including Imagism, Vorticism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, and Surrealism. Readings will include major poets from America, Britain, and the Continent, such as Yeats, Lawrence, Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Moore, H.D., Hughes, Cullen, Stramm, Ball, Arp, Desnos, Breton, Mayakovski, and others.

  
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    EN 492 - Contemporary Poetry

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of the poetry of the latter half of the twentieth century. Poets studied may include Wright, Wilbur, Bishop, Berryman, Roethke, Plath, Brooks, Olson, Snyder, Ginsberg, O’Hara, Bly, Rich, Angelou, and others.

  
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    EN 493 - Modern Fiction

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course is a study of fiction from 1900-1970, focusing on Modernism and Postmodernism. Readings will include major American and British authors, but will also include various world authors.

  
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    EN 494 - Contemporary Fiction

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course is a study of fiction of the latter half of the 20th century to the present. The course will include both short story writers and novelists such as Saul Bellow, Raymond Carver, Alice Munro, J.M. Coetzee, Amy Hempel, Ian McEwan, and others.

  
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    EN 495 - Drama from the Nineteenth-Century to the Present

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    This course will focus on the dramatic arts, including the rise of the modern drama and its construction based on political and cultural values as well as the anti-hero and his or her function within the play. Theatrical experience such as performance art will also be included.

  
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    EN 499 - English Capstone Course

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior standing and 24 hours of English, exclusive of 101 and 102

    An integrated study of major literary movements in American, British, and World Literature, which will place these movements in their historical, political and social contexts. Several analytical essays will culminate in a senior thesis to be presented to students and faculty.

    Note: Required of all majors.

  
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    ENT 280 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the entrepreneurial process and exposes students to issues faced by entrepreneurs who start new businesses.  This course offers insight into the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs and provides the student with the fundamental skills needed to identify, manage, and grow a small business.

  
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    ENT 372 - Entrepreneurial Finance

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENT 280

    Financing entrepreneurial ventures focuses on the primary financial elements necessary in starting, growing and harvesting the venture: assessment of opportunity, marshaling the necessary resources and capitalizing on the opportunity. This course Will include topics such as: leveraged buyouts; initial public offerings; valuation techniques; deal structuring; techniques for purchasing the company; legal forms of business organization; and sources of capital.

  
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    ENT 399 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3

    A variable content course in whice students pursue topics or subjects of current interest in the field of Entrepreneurship that are not part of the regular curriculum.  The specific topic is announced when the course is offered.

    Note: May be repeated with change in content.

  
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    ENT 400 - Internship in Entrpreneurship

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Advanced standing, 2.5 GPA overall and in major.

    A practical, structured program of work experience in the field of Entrepreneurship with a participating employer of the student intern’s choice. The student intern must be employed a minimum of 40 to 120 hours depending on the internship (40 hours = 1 credit). The student intern must be supervised by the employer and a faculty member. The student intern must complete a research paper on a subject that will benfit the employer, a personal journal, and the supervisor’s evaluation must be submitted prior to the end of the semester in order for the student to gain credit for this course.

    Also Listed as: BU 400
    Note: Open to Business Administration majors with a concentration in Entrepreneurship only. Internship may be taken twice for a total of 6 hours.

  
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    ENT 433 - High Technology Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENT 280

    This course focuses on providing students with an understanding of the unique industry contexts, strategic opportunities, and constraints faced by high technology start-up ventures. Such ventures are defined here as those typically funded with high risk/high return venture capital, and expected to achieve liquidity for investors in approximately five years from start-up. The students will work in teams to write a business plan for a new venture they have conceived.

  
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    ENT 435 - Marketing for the Entrepreneur

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ENT 280 and MKT 361

    This course identifies and applies the different marketing visions, approaches, strategies, and practices used by entrepreneurs to compete in highly competitive markets. Further, this course identifies the different strategic and tactical applications used by today’s entrepreneurs.

  
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    ENT 487 - Entrepreneurship Projects

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FIN 355, MKT 361, MGT 381, or permission of the Department Chair of Business Administration

    A capstone, project-based course that will focus on developing a comprehensive business plan. Emerging and varying entrepreneurial business issues and practices will be covered.

  
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    ENT 499 - Independent Projects in Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of the Instructor and Department Chair.

    Independent project for an advanced or special-interest Entrepreneurship topic conducted under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

    Note: May be repeated with change in content.

  
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    FIN 240 - Personal Finance

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to cover the basic concepts of personal finance. This course informs students about the financial planning process including setting goals, career planning, money management, tax strategy, credit, savings, housing and transportation choices, insurance fundamentals of investing, and planning for retirement.

  
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    FIN 340 - Financial Markets and Institutions

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EC 201, EC 202, ACC 212

    Study of money and monetary systems, commercial banks and their operations, and banking systems. It serves two functions. First, it is a specialized finance course which describes the operations of a commercial bank (which is one type of financial institution) and provides some professional training for one who wants to go into the field of banking. Second, it describes the institutions of money, monetary systems, and banking as a basis for studying monetary and fiscal theory and policy.

  
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    FIN 355 - Business Finance

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EC 201, EC 202, ACC 212, BQA 345

    An examination of basic problems and principles in financial management with special attention to corporate organizations. Asset management, sources of funds, application of the financial aspects of the enterprise.

  
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    FIN 399 - Special Topics in Finance

    Credits: 3

    A variable content course in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest in the field of Finance that are not part of the regular curriculum. The specific topic is announced when the course is offered.

    Note: May be repeated with change in content.

  
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    FIN 445 - Risk Management and Assessment

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 123 or equivalent.

    This course is designed to provide an overview of risk management and insurance. Risk management is the structured, disciplined approach to dealing with unknown events in business and how they can affect project performance. Students will learn to identify differenct types of risks, how to assess the significance of each type of risk and how to mitigate the negative consequences of different types of risk.

  
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    FIN 499 - Independent Projects in Finance

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of the Instructor and Department Chair

    Independent project for an advanced or special-interest Finance topic conducted under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

    Note: May be repeated with a change in content.

  
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    FL 410 - Methods and Materials in Secondary Language

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education

    This course emphasizes selection and application of teaching materials, methods and techniques of delivery, course objectives, and evaluation. Students will prepare practical teaching material in their major language.

    Note: Required of all students seeking teacher certification in foreign languages at the secondary level. This course does not count toward a major or minor in languages.

  
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    FLF 101 - French I

    Credits: 4

    Development of the basic language skills: aural/oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

  
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    FLF 102 - French II

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: FLF 101

    Development of the basic language skills: aural/oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.

 

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