Aug 07, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

12. Courses


 
  
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    PHL 310 - Existentialism

    Credits: 3

    A study of the development and innovations of extentialist philosophy and literature. Major emphasis will be on the writings of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, and Beauvoir.

  
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    PHL 450 - Special Topics in Philosophy

    Credits: 3

    Note: Course may be taken for credit twice; credit may not exceed 6 hours.

  
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    PHL 451 - Political and Social Philosophy

    Credits: 3

    A study of alternative philosophical systems as they interpret such concepts as liberty, authority, justice, and law in human societies and politics.

    Also Listed as: POL 451 
  
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    PHL 465 - Contemporary Ethical Problems

    Credits: 3

    A study in some detail of various ethical problems encountered in professional settings. Focus upon problematic situations requiring decisions by professional people.

  
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    PLG 101 - Introduction to the Legal Profession

    Credits: 3

    The definition and role of the paralegal in the practice of law. History and organization of the profession. Ethics and professional responsibility. Introduction to law, the legal system, litigation, and legal analysis.

    Note: Prerequisite for all other paralegal courses. Prerequisites may be waived ONLY with Director’s written approval.

  
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    PLG 200 - Legal Bibliography and Research I

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or concurrent enrollment in PLG 101 .

    This course focuses on legal research basics using legal digests, encyclopedias, statutory material, citations to reporters, and basic electronic research.

    Note: Prerequisites may be waived ONLY with Director’s written approval.

  
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    PLG 202 - Legal Bibliography and Research II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  and PLG 200 

    This course is a continuation of PLG 200  and focuses on legal research and bibliographies with emphasis on advanced electronic research, and the preparation of legal memorandums and writing.

  
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    PLG 241 - The Legal Environment of Business

    Credits: 3

    An environmental approach to the study of law including a background of the economic and legal environment as it pertains to profit and/or nonprofit organizations along with ethical considerations and social and political influences as they affect such organizations.

    Note: Prerequisites may be waived ONLY with Director’s written approval.

  
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    PLG 250 - Evidentiary Basics

    Credits: 3

    This course will examine the rules governing the admission, exclusion, and presentation of evidence in judicial proceedings. Topics to be covered will include but will not be limited to relevancy, character and habit evidence, examination and impeachment of witnesses, presentation of evidence, and the hearsay rule and its exceptions.

  
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    PLG 301 - Contracts

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    The objectives of this course are to acquaint students with contractual terminology, elements of contracts, effects of breach and recision, computation of damages, practical aspects of contract construction and uniform commercial code.

  
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    PLG 303 - Torts

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies.

    Acquaints students with tort terminology, elements of tort actions, computation of damages and practical aspects of tort litigation and defense.

  
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    PLG 325 - Business Organizations

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies.

    Includes an introduction to various business organizations such as Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies with an emphasis on corporations, incorporation procedure, corporation finance, business planning, contract law and corporate counsel. Areas also covered are corporate employees and shareholders, corporate operations, security laws, regulatory compliance, merger and acquisition, sales and termination.

  
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    PLG 327 - Estates, Trusts and Wills

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies.

    Introduction to estates as well as wills; intestacy and administration; assets of estates; and federal estate tax.

  
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    PLG 330 - Legal Writing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101 , PLG 200 , and EN 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    A study of the prose of the legal profession, including work with contracts, letters, memoranda of law, briefs, and court documents such as pleadings, discovery, and motions.

    Note: Prerequisites may be waived ONLY with Director’s written approval.

  
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    PLG 340 - Law Office Technology and Management

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  and PLG 200  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    This course focuses on the use of technology in the law office emphasizing computers and computer applications. Word processing programs and legal software programs will be used. The course will emphasize management, production, personnel, research and record keeping.

  
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    PLG 350 - Health Care Law



    This course focuses on the legal environment in health care delivery such as the types of health care entities, and the laws and ethics that govern them, and discusses the major areas of health care law, including state and federal regulatory research and administrative law review. Also highlighted are important contemporary topics such as electronic health records, patient privacy and security, corporate compliance, and physician professional relationships.

  
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    PLG 351 - Criminal Trial Practicum

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 250  

    An examination of evidentiary reasoning and court room procedure. Students will learn the importance of preparation, professionalism, ethical behavior, and teamwork as they prepare to compete in simulated criminal judicial proceedings.

  
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    PLG 352 - Civil Trial Practicum

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 250  

    An examination of evidentiary reasoning and court room procedure. Students will learn the importance of preparation, professionalism, ethical behavior, and teamwork as they prepare to compete in simulated civil judicial proceedings.

  
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    PLG 401 - Special Topics in Paralegal Studies

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Note: May be repeated for credit based on change of topic.

  
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    PLG 427 - Administrative Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Acquaints a student with Administrative Agency Law on a State and Federal level, such as Social Security, Worker’s Compensation, Environmental Protection Agency, etc. The student will study regulations, hearing procedures and appeals.

  
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    PLG 428 - Real Estate Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Introduction to estates in real property. Includes such topics as transfers, mortgages, recording statutes, platting descriptions, title searches, real estate closings, and title insurance.

  
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    PLG 429 - Civil Litigation

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Introduction to basic principles of procedural law. Areas of study are the proper conduct of the client interview, initiating the civil action, and answering in defendant’s behalf. Other areas include informal discovery, motions for summary judgment, settlement, pretrial procedures, assisting at trial, and postjudgment activities.

    Note: Prerequisites may be waived ONLY with Director’s written approval.

  
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    PLG 431 - Criminal Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    A study of criminal liability, the Fifth and Sixth Amendments, pretrial discovery, indictments, and pleas.

  
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    PLG 432 - Family Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    An examination of matrimonial law, adoption, the commercial law aspects of family life, and family law practice.

  
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    PLG 433 - Environmental Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Survey of environmental laws and cases geared toward helping the paralegal have a working knowledge of environmental law and how environmental law may impact the different aspects of working cases with which a paralegal may come in contact.

  
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    PLG 434 - Bankruptcy Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Survey of bankruptcy laws and cases with practical experience in completing the forms and obtaining the information from the clients.

  
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    PLG 440 - Practical Legal Lab

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG majors only and 18 hours of Legal Studies courses, or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    This course is practical in nature. Students select an area of specialization and are then placed in a legal setting where they exercise those skills and information developed in the classroom. The evaluation of the student’s ability is done as a combined effort of a paralegal faculty member and a representation of the sponsoring law firm.

    Note: This course meets the field experience requirements for the paralegal major.

  
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    PLG 451 - School Law

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PLG 101  or approval of the Director of Legal Studies

    Course focuses on legal issues involving the rights of students, teachers, parents, and administrators; topics include privacy, employment, freedom of speech and religion, liability, search and seizure, athletics and student organizations, discipline, and student records.

  
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    POL 101 - The Study and Practice of Politics

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to political structures, processes, and outcomes. Students learn about the political world, from the actions of individuals motivated by their beliefs to the actions of governments motivated by their quest for material power. General theories and controversies of politics are featured, as well as an overview of how researchers study politics.

  
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    POL 150 - American Government

    Credits: 3

    This course serves as an introduction to the key actors, institutions, and political ideals that animate the government of the United States. Students learn about the foundational ideals of US political culture:  liberty and democracy. The US Constitution, the rights and obligations of citizens, and various tools and types of political participation are surveyed; the latter includes attention to public opinion, interest groups, political parties, elections, and the news media. Students also study the institutional design and typical operation of the three national branches–Congress, the Presidency and federal bureaucracy, as well as, the Supreme Court–in addition to their limitations in a federal system.

  
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    POL 202 - Affecting Political Change

    Credits: 3

    This course explores various methods of political participation in democracies particularly in the US. We survey historical and contemporary examples of citizens seeking to affect change and ask whether and how they succeed. The class also involves an active learning component, where students plan and undertake their own project in citizenship.

  
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    POL 203 - Social and Political Analysis

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite:  

     


    A hands-on lesson in how researchers explain social issues and even solve social problems through application of the scientific method. Students learn how to: pose a research question; plan and design their research approach; employ a variety of research methods; and interpret and present their research results. Of particular interest for those interested in graduate school in any of the social sciences.

  
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    POL 250 - World Politics

    Credits: 3

    A study of the relationships among governments, international organizations, corporations, transnational civil society, and individuals in world politics. Surveys key differences among states and considers how this affects their interactions and international law. Questions the traditional hierarchy of high politics (war, defense, diplomacy) and low politics (economics, environment, ethnic conflict) in a post-September 11 world.

  
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    POL 290 - Politics Lab

    Credits: 1-2

    This course is designed to get students “doing” in the field of politics, governance, advocacy, or any other applied area of politics. Students may participate in undergraduate research, service learning, group projects, and/or field work as part of this class.

    Note: May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 hours

  
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    POL 300 - Genocide Studies

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a multifaceted study of genocide. Based upon several case studies, including the Jewish Holocaust, Rwanda, Bosnia, and Cambodia the course examines the nature of genocide, international and legal responses to genocide, and why ordinary people commit and contribute to genocidal acts.

    Also Listed as: HIS 300  
  
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    POL 301 - Public Administration

    Credits: 3

    An analysis of the organization, procedures, and purpose of the executive branch of government. Students explore the duties of agencies at the national, state, and local levels. Special emphasis is placed on the challenges facing administrators concerning personnel, budgeting, law, program evaluation, inter-agency and intergovernmental relations, and public relations. Of particular interest for those who plan to enter public service.

  
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    POL 307 - Public Budgeting

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: POL 301 

    An examination of the history, institutions and techniques of public budgeting and finance. The practices and fundamental concepts of governmental budgeting, public finance, and financial management will be introduced. Oral and written communication skills will be emphasized.

  
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    POL 309 - Protest and Contention

    Credits: 3

    This course will prepare students to think systematically about contentious politics - processes in which people make conflicting collective claims on each other or on third parties - as they participate in them, observe them, and/or learn about how they are happening elsewhere. We will review theories of political contention and ask why people protest, how they choose their tactics, and why they succeed or fail in achieving their goals. We will spend most of our time examining how such forms of contention as social movements, revolutions, nationalist mobilization, and ethnic conflict have worked in different times and places, as well as thinking through parallels and differences among them.

  
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    POL 335 - Religion and Politics in Contemporary America

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces students to the fundamental impact of religion on the major dimensions of politics in contemporary America. The principle aim of the course is to create an understanding of how religion and politics interact in the pursuit of public policy rather than explore questions of morality.

    Also Listed as: REL 335 
  
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    POL 355 - Contemporary Events

    Credits: 1

    Major domestic and foreign events and problems of the present day. Periodical reading and individual reports. Recommended for students seeking greater understanding of the news and public affairs.

    Note: May be taken twice.

  
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    POL 360 - Political Parties and Interest Groups

    Credits: 3

    An examination of political parties and interest groups as vehicles of public participation in American politics. Focuses on party role in recruiting and funding candidates for office and interest group lobbying for public policy outcomes. Presents students with a key dilemma of democracy: how participation can inform government but also bias policy in favor of the privileged few.

  
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    POL 370 - Campaigns & Elections

    Credits: 3

    From candidate recruitment to the election aftermath, this course analyzes the roles of political parties, monetary contributions, the media, public opinion and other forces in determining how campaigns are run and who wins/loses. The electoral mechanisms (primary v. general elections, popular v. electoral votes, etc.) are also dissected to assess their ability to affirm meaningful citizen choice. Ultimately, students evaluate the power of campaigns and elections to renew, but also endanger, American democracy.

  
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    POL 380 - US Foreign Policy

    Credits: 3

    This course analyzes the contexts in which American foreign policy is made; describes the players, historical patterns, and basis of U.S. foreign policy; and evaluates the role of the U.S. in the post-Cold War era by focusing on different regions of the world and selected international issues.

  
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    POL 381 - U.S. as a World Power to 1898

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the rise of the United States as a world power from the creation of the nation to its acquisition of foreign dependencies. Emphasis will be placed on the country’s relationship with other nations.

    Also Listed as: HIS 381  
  
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    POL 382 - U.S. as a World Power Since 1898

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the United States’ role as a world power from the end of the Spanish-American War to the end of the Cold War. Emphasis will be placed on the country’s relationship with other nations.

    Also Listed as: HIS 382  
  
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    POL 390 - Southern Politics

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the politics of the Southern United States as it relates to U.S. political development more generally and as a case of significant political phenomenon common to post colonial democracy and development in the Global South. The course highlights the politics of race, political violence, and multi-ethnic democratization, including mobilization for civil rights; party development and realignment, poverty and political economy, and center-periphery relations.

  
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    POL 395 - American Constitutional Law

    Credits: 3

    The major judicial decisions that have shaped the development of the American system and philosophy of government. The development of our constitution, our concepts of government, and our political and legal institutions from their origins in England and colonial America to the present time. Especially recommended for students seeking careers in law and public administration.

  
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    POL 401 - The American Congress

    Credits: 3

    Students examine the representative and lawmaking functions of the U.S. Congress. The process of transforming bills into law is detailed; however, examination of the impact of committee/subcommittee discretion, leadership imperatives, party strategy, White House initiatives, media agenda-setting, and other forces illustrate how the ideal of orderly, coherent lawmaking may be inhibited.

  
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    POL 410 - The American Presidency

    Credits: 3

    The nature of the American Presidential system. Emphasis on the constitutional, institutional, and political elements of presidential power in national and foreign affairs. The people of the Presidency, various concepts of Presidential power and the relationship between the President, Congress, the bureaucracy, the party system, and the American public.

  
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    POL 440 - Urban Politics and Policy

    Credits: 3

    Examination of the implications of urban growth, the organization of urban and metropolitan areas, and political forces operating at that level.

  
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    POL 450 - Special Topics in Political Science

    Credits: 3

    An advanced seminar analyzing a specialized topic in political science. Topic to be chosen by the instructor.

    Note: Students may apply a maximum of six (6) credits of POL 450 toward a political science degree.

  
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    POL 451 - Political and Social Philosophy

    Credits: 3

    A study of alternative philosophical systems as they interpret such concepts as liberty, authority, justice, and law in human societies and politics.

    Also Listed as: PHL 451  
  
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    POL 475 - Terrorism

    Credits: 3

    The attacks of September 11, 2001 reinforce the value of a strategy long employed by the weak: terrorist violence to intimidate or destabilize a society. This course examines why terrorism is chosen and under which conditions it has succeeded in attaining desired political objectives. It then explores various counter-terrorism methods and how they have succeeded (or not) in stopping/preventing such violence. Students ultimately assess the consequences for conducting world politics in what is described as an era of global terror.

  
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    POL 490 - Internship/Practicum

    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite: Political Science majors, or permission of the Department Chair of History, Political Science, and Geography

    An experiential program that allows students to apply their academic preparation to particular political/governmental settings. Students work for a political organization, government agency, city hall, or other relevant institution and complete written assignments for academic credit.

    Note: A student must work at least 120 hours for three (3) credits and at least 240 hours for six (6) credits. Placement opportunity must be approved by the instructor. Assignments require students to assess institutional functions, political behavior and relevant public policy with respect to standards presented in other courses in the political science major.

  
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    PRO 490 - Senior Seminar in Professional Studies

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Declared major in Professional Studies

    This capstone course integrates content and skills learned in student focus groups. The student will explore career opportunities in their focus groups as well as from connections between these groups through the creation of a significant final project. Students must enroll in the course during their final semester in the Professional Studies program.

  
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    PS 103 - Introductory Geology

    Credits: 3

    Emphasis placed on the earth’s dynamic systems, their sources of energy, and their constructive and destructive effects on the earth’s crust. Mineralogy and petrology are introduced as well as the various agents of erosion and deposition.

  
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    PS 104 - Historical Geology

    Credits: 3

    The earth from its cosmic origin to the present with special regard for the physical events and history of life during each of the great divisions of geological time.

  
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    PS 106 - Introductory Astronomy

    Credits: 3

    An introductory survey of our solar system and the universe beyond. Topics will include planetary bodies, satellites, comets, meteors, stars, nebulae, galaxies, pulsars, quasars, black holes, along with recognition of the major constellations and other pertinent material of general astronomical interest.

  
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    PS 107 - Introductory Physics

    Credits: 3

    A brief survey of the fundamentals of physics. Topics include kinematics, heat, light, gravity, work, power, energy, and metric conversions.

    Note: No credit can be earned for this course if the student already has credit for PSP 211 , PSP 212 , PSP 213 , or PSP 214 .

  
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    PS 108 - Introductory Chemistry

    Credits: 3

    A brief survey of the fundamentals of chemistry. Topics include behavior of atoms and molecules, construction of chemical formulas, bonding, and how it affects macroscopic properties.

    Note: No credit can be earned for this course if the student already has credit for PSC 111  or PSC 112 .

  
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    PS 109 - General Physical Science

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science and science education majors who are required to complete one or more physical science courses. Major topics will include physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science.

  
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    PS 313 - Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Science in the Secondary School

    Credits: 3

    This course is taught concurrently with BSB 313 . This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of methods in the teaching of science in junior and senior high school. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications, such as laboratory preparation, safety, and teaching and classroom management. Each student will have the opportunity to do some teaching in the general chemistry laboratories at MUW. Students will also review current reference materials on science teaching, as well as state adopted textbooks in chemistry and other physical sciences.

    Note: Only open to students admitted to Teacher Education. This course does not count toward fulfillment of the requirements for the Physical Science major. It is for teacher certification only.

  
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    PSC 111 - General Chemistry I

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: or concurrent enrollment in MA 113  or higher (not MA 123 ) or demonstrated proficiency in math

    This course is designed to lay the groundwork for future study in chemistry by familiarizing the student with fundamentals of chemistry including naming of chemical species, stoichiometry, and atomic structure in addition to problem-solving.

  
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    PSC 111L - General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: PSC 111 , or concurrent enrollment in PSC 111 

    This course reinforces the topics covered in PSC 111  through experimentation.

  
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    PSC 112 - General Chemistry II

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: PSC 111 

    This course is a continuation of PSC 111 . The course continues the exploration of chemistry fundamentals with kinetics, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry among other topics.

  
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    PSC 112L - General Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: PSC 112 , or concurrent enrollment in PSC 112 .

    This course reinforces the topics covered in PSC 112  through experimentation.

  
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    PSC 211 - Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: PSC 111 , PSC 112  (w/labs)

    This course is designed to give students a first hand knowledge of the fundamentals of organic chemistry including bonding, organic reactions, reaction mechanism, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy.

  
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    PSC 211L - Organic Chemistry Lab I

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: PSC 211 , or concurrent enrollment in PSC 211 .

    A laboratory course complementing the lecture course PSC 211 .

  
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    PSC 212 - Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: PSC 211  (w/lab)

    This course is a continuation of PSC 211  and provides a fundamental background for understanding the structure, properties, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds, especially aromatic compounds, carbonyl, carboxyl derivatives, and biomolecules.

  
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    PSC 212L - Organic Chemistry Lab II

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: PSC 212 , or concurrent enrollment in PSC 212 

    A laboratory course complementing the lecture course PSC 212 .

  
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    PSC 312 - Quantitative Analysis

    Credits: 4

    Laboratory-Lecture

    Prerequisite: PSC 112  (w/lab)

    This is primarily a laboratory course designed to develop the technique necessary in making quantitative determinations. Typical volumetric and gravimetric determinations are studied. Lecture on theories and computations accompany the laboratory work.

  
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    PSC 450 - Physical Chemistry I

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: PSC 212  (w/lab), PSP 212  or PSP 214 , MA 181 , and MA 182 . Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in MA 283 .

    This course includes a development of thermodynamics of solids, liquids, and gases; solutions; equilibria; electrochemistry; and kinetics. Emphasis will be placed on deriving mathematical models which describe macroscopic-scale processes.

  
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    PSC 451 - Physical Chemistry II

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: PSC 212  (w/lab), PSP 212  or PSP 214 , MA 181 , and MA 182 . Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in MA 283 .

    This course includes an introduction to quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, molecular structure, and statistical mechanics. Emphasis will be placed on developing mathematical models to account for microscopic-scale processes.

  
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    PSC 461 - Instrumental Analysis

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: PSC 312  and PSP 212  or PSP 214 . Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: PSC 212  (w/lab).

    This is a course designed to acquaint the student with instruments used in analytical methods. Use and operation of instruments together with theoretical aspects and limitations of each will be included.

  
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    PSC 465 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: PSC 112  (w/lab), PSP 212  or PSP 214 , and PSC 212  (w/lab)

    This course covers bonding structure, coordination chemistry, and organometallics.

  
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    PSC 466 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: PSC 212  (w/lab)

    This course covers reaction mechanisms, natural products, theoretical chemistry, and other areas of organic chemistry.

  
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    PSC 467 - Biochemistry

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  (w/labs), PSC 211 , PSC 212  (w/labs); BSB 230  highly recommended

    A one semester survey of biochemistry emphasizing protein biochemistry (protein structure and activity, enzyme kinetics, catalytic and regulatory strategies, metabolic pathways) and introducing physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids as necessary to understand protein form and function.

  
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    PSC 470 - Introduction to Chemical Research

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSC 212  (w/labs)

    Designed for junior and senior chemistry and physical science majors. After consultation with a chemistry faculty adviser the student selects a problem requiring literature and laboratory research. A written report in publishable form is required.

    Note: May be repeated once (3-3).

  
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    PSC 490 - Special Topics in Physical Sciences

    Credits: 3-4

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    This course will provide advanced study in a current topic in the area of the physical sciences to be decided by the instructor. Topics could include spectroscopy, polymer chemistry, or the chemistry of natural products.

    Note: May be repeated once.

  
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    PSP 211 - General Physics

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: MA 113  or higher, excluding MA 123 Statistics Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSP 211L

    An introduction to the basic principles of classical physics using algebra and trigonometry.  Major topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, light, and optics.  A fundamental knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is strongly recommended.

  
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    PSP 212 - General Physics

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: MA 113  or higher, excluding MA 123 Statistics Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSP 212L

    An introduction to the basic principles of classical physics using algebra and trigonometry. Major topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, light, and optics. A fundamental knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is strongly recommended.

  
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    PSP 213 - General Physics (Calculus Based)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: MA 182  

    A calculus-based introduction to the general principles of physics including a treatment of mechanics, work, energy, momentum, elasticity, fluids, vibrations, sound, temperature, heat, electricity, magnetism and light.

  
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    PSP 214 - General Physics (Calculus Based)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: MA 182 

    A calculus-based introduction to the general principles of physics including a treatment of mechanics, work, energy, momentum, elasticity, fluids, vibrations, sound, temperature, heat, electricity, magnetism and light.

  
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    PSY 101 - General Psychology

    Credits: 3

    This survey course introduces the student to contemporary theories and methods in psychology.

  
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    PSY 201 - Introduction to APA Style

    Credits: 1

    This course introduces the student to the professional writing style of the American Psychological Association (APA). Topics include ethics, quotation, citation of sources, and reference format.

  
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    PSY 202 - Global Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Global Psychology explores consciousness research that relates human consciousness to the science of quantum physics and evolutionary biology, connecting the human to the natural world and integrating schools of psychology with levels of the spectrum of consciousness; it shows how the world’s spiritual traditions are also consistent with current sciences.  The implications of this new knowledge point to the role of the human in the universe, living in harmony with planet Earth, enhancing unity with the realm of Spirit, and improving the health of body, mind, and spirit.  Global Psychology places psychology in an ecological context and draws on psychological insight for recognizing cultural pathologies leading to the possible destruction of the planet and exploring effective and sustainable lifestyles, environmental action, and world peace.

  
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    PSY 206 - Human Growth and Development

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces the student to the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the individual throughout the lifespan.

  
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    PSY 210 - Professional Code of Ethics: Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  and PSY 201 

    This course addresses the potential ethical issues that could arise in the professions of psychology.  Included in this course are applications of ethical standards in hypothetical scenarios in various professions and research areas of psychology.

  
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    PSY 290 - Introduction to Research

    Credits: 3



    Prepares students to perform basic research skills, including locating and summarizing published research.

     


    Also Listed as: FS 290 

  
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    PSY 302 - Child Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201  and PSY 206 

    An indepth study of theory and research in child development from conception through late childhood with a focus on sensory, cognitive, social and personality development.

  
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    PSY 304 - Abnormal Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  and PSY 201 

    This course focuses on the etiology, classification and treatment of psychopathological disorders.

  
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    PSY 305 - Personality

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  and PSY 201 

    This course focuses on personality traits, which are individual characteristics that are relatively stable over time and situations. This course is based on a topical approach to current theories and research on personality.

  
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    PSY 320 - Physiological Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  and PSY 201 

    This course examines the physiological bases of human behavior. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

  
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    PSY 325 - Adult Development

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201  and PSY 206 

    An in-depth study of physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development during adulthood.  The use of current research and theory to understand adult development will be emphasized.

  
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    PSY 328 - Adolescent Development

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201  and PSY 206 

    An in-depth study of physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development during adolescence.  The use of current research and theory to understand adolescent development will be emphasized.

  
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    PSY 335 - Child Behavior Modification: Typical and Special Needs

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 317  or PSY 302  

    This course reviews the methods, constructs, and principles of behavior analysis and behavior modification. Content includes the application of observation and behavioral modification techniques in the home and in the classroom for children and adolescents with both typical and special needs. Format includes both in-class and observational learning components.

  
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    PSY 340 - Sensation and Perception

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  and PSY 201 

    This course provides an in-depth study of the physiological and neurological aspects of psychological development and human interaction with the environment.

  
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    PSY 350 - Psychology of Women

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  or PSY 206  or permission of the Psychology and Family Studies Department Chair

    This course will present an overview of the biological, social, and cultural factors that affect women throughout the lifespan.

    Also Listed as: WS 352 .
  
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    PSY 360 - Educational Psychology

    Credits: 3

    This course presents an overview of the process of learning. It provides students with skills needed to work with others in an educational setting. It includes coverage of theories of development, assessing and dealing with individual variability, devising objectives, learning theories, motivation, and measurement and evaluation of learning.

  
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    PSY 370 - Social Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 101  and PSY 201 

    This course examines individual behavior in its social and cultural context. Theoretical and empirical examination of core social psychological issues, such as social cognition, social influence, interpersonal relationships, and group behavior, are emphasized.

 

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